CALL FOR PAPERS — STUDIES IN MEDIEVALISM XXXI:  POLITICAL MEDIEVALISM III 

From Hitler’s “Third Reich” to Bush’s “crusade” against terrorism, professional politicians have often invoked the Middle Ages to justify their actions. But they are far from alone, for many of their constituents have also deployed medievalism for political purposes, as in condemning impoverished countries for “failing to escape” the Middle Ages. Indeed, much of medievalism, not to mention the study of it, has revolved around politics of one kind or another, as became evident from the unprecedented number of submissions to our two previous volume (XXIX & XXX) on this theme. Studies in Medievalism, a peer-reviewed print and on-line publication, is therefore once again seeking not only feature articles of 6,000-12,000 words (including notes) on any postmedieval responses to the Middle Ages, but also essays of approximately 3,000 words (including notes) on the intersection of medievalism (studies) and politics. How exactly have professional and amateur politicians misconstrued, mangled, and manipulated the Middle Ages and to what end? How have politics influenced the development of medievalism and/or study of it? In what sense, if any, is it possible to have medievalism (studies) without politics? How might medievalism otherwise be deployed in professional or amateur politics? In responding to these and related questions, contributors are invited to give particular examples, but their submissions, which should be sent to Karl Fugelso (kfugelso@towson.edu) in English and Word by August 1, 2021 (note that priority will be given to papers in the order they are received), should also address the implications of those examples for the discipline as a whole.

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CFP: 35th International Conference on Medievalism 

Impossible Pastimes: Playing With, In, and Through the Middle Ages 


35th International Conference on Medievalism 

Old Dominion University
Norfolk, VA, November 12-14, 2020 

        

Play is one of the most significant sites of production in contemporary medievalism. As evidenced by the popularity and ubiquity of medieval-themed games, it is one of the primary ways through which the dominant, consensus view of the Middle Ages is reproduced as a political, historical, economic, and cultural reality in both mass culture and the popular imagination. Play, as such, functions to reify many of the most problematic aspects of traditional medievalism, including the persistent racial and gendered stereotypes that explicitly imagine the Middle Ages as a period of profound cultural crisis—a crucible of violence and want in which masculine white privilege was tested and emerged in its nascent, modern form to exercise sovereignty over the peoples and cultures that, despite their threat, were simultaneously shown to be inferior. 

       Yet by the same token, play inherently calls this vision of reality into question. As Johan Huizinga writes, play interpellates participants in a magic circle in which space and time are suspended—an imaginary situation that, according to Lev Vgotsky, is a manifestation of “desires and tendencies of what cannot be realized immediately.” Play, in this sense, is not an expression of what is but of what is denied. Facilitated through ritual and performance, it represents an attempt to make material and therefore real a fundamentally occult vision of what its participants want their worlds to be. Play, as such, inherently calls into question the veracity of its own productions. In the context of the medievalism of the contemporary moment, it foregrounds the fact that many of the problematic worldviews that are constructed as historical reality by contemporary medievalism are themselves fantasies.  

       What is more, play simultaneously recognizes that other fantasies are possible. In its ability to at once conjure and critique reality, it foregrounds the fact that there are always other ways of re-imagining ourselves and our circumstances via the Middle Ages or any number of other impossible sites of desire. Conceived as an experiment in playing with—which is to say, re-imagining the generative possibilities of the Middle Ages, the 2020 ISSM Conference seeks to interrogate the doubled potential of play as it is manifested not only in contemporary medieval-themed games, hobbies, and pastimes, but in any of the myriad ways that we play with the Middle Ages through art, scholarship, or other forms of critical inquiry and cultural production broadly defined. 

         Please send abstracts of c. 300 words for individual papers or entire sessions on medieval-themed games, hobbies, pastimes and all other kinds of medievalisms (which is to say, other forms of medievalesque play) by September 15, 2020 to Kevin Moberly (kmoberly@odu.edu). For the wide range of topics of interest to the study of medievalism, please visit the table of contents pages of Studies in Medievalism and The Year’s Work in Medievalism, and the reviews published in Medievally Speaking. More information about the 2020 ISSM conference can be found on our conference website. 

This year’s conference will be hosted by Old Dominion University, located in Norfolk, Virginia. Out of an abundance of caution due to the COVID-19 Pandemic, this year’s ISSM Conference will be held entirely online and virtually. Old Dominion University has a robust, well developed distance education infrastructure, which will allow us to hold sessions synchronously, asynchronously, or as a mixture of both formats. 

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Call for Submissions

The Year’s Work in Medievalism 34 (2019): Intersections

The thematic focus for Issue 34 (2019) of The Year’s Work in Medievalism is intersections. Medievalism studies sit at numerous crossroads; many works of medievalism bridge multiple traditional boundaries, whether of discipline, genre, historicism, medium, mode, and more. We therefore invite submissions, both scholarly and creative, that address, explore, contextualize, or otherwise grapple with intersections and intersectionality within the field. Contributions arising from the 2019 meeting of the International Society for the Study of Medievalism are also welcome.

The Year’s Work in Medievalism is a peer-reviewed open access journal providing codisciplinary and interdisciplinary communication for scholars interested in the reception of medieval culture in post-medieval times. We welcome submissions in English covering all aspects of medievalism, including traditional essay-style submissions that are 3,000-4,000 words (including notes) in length, as well as creative works.

Deadline for submissions: August 31, 2020.

Submissions and inquiries regarding submissions should be directed to both Renée Ward (rward@lincoln.ac.uk) and Valerie Johnson (vjohnso6@montevallo.edu). Please follow the journal style sheet when preparing your submission for consideration.

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CALL FOR PAPERS: Studies in Medievalism XXX

POLITICAL MEDIEVALISM II

From Hitler’s“Third Reich”to Bush’s “crusade”against terrorism, professional politicians have often invoked the Middle Ages to justify their actions. But they are far from alone, for many of their constituents have also deployed medievalism for political purposes, as in condemning impoverished countries for “failing to escape”the Middle Ages. Indeed, much of medievalism, not to mention the study of it, has revolved around politics of one kind or another, as became evident from the unprecedented number of submissions to our previous volume (XXIX) on this theme. Studies in Medievalism, a peer-reviewed print and on-line publication, is therefore once again seeking not only feature articles of 6,000-12,000 words (including notes) on any postmedieval responses to the Middle Ages, but also essays of approximately 3,000 words (including notes) on the intersection of medievalism (studies) and politics. How exactly have professional and amateur politicians misconstrued, mangled, and manipulated the Middle Ages and to what end? How have politics influenced the development of medievalism and/or study of it? In what sense, if any, is it possible to have medievalism (studies) without politics? How might medievalism otherwise be deployed in professional or amateur politics? In responding to these and related questions, contributors are invited to give particular examples, but their submissions, which should be sent to Karl Fugelso (kfugelso@towson.edu) in English and Word by August 1, 2020 (note that priority will be given to papers in the order they are received), should also address the implications of those examples for the discipline as a whole.

SUBMISSION STYLE SHEET

Studies in Medievalism is the oldest academic journal dedicated entirely to the study of post-medieval images and perceptions of the Middle Ages. It accepts articles on both scholarly and popular works, with particular interest in the interaction between scholarship and re-creation. Its aim is to promote the interdisciplinary study of medievalism as a contemporary cultural phenomenon. Originally published privately, Studies in Medievalism is currently published by Boydell & Brewer, Ltd.. Click on the below links to Back Volumes for details and to order online.

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Call for Papers: International Conference on Medievalism

MEDIEVALISM and the NORTH

27-28 July 2020  Aarhus University

In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, translations of Old Norse texts into modern languages ignited a new interest among poets and artists in early-medieval Northern European culture. Today, the early-medieval North once again captures our imagination – for better or for worse. The international success of Michael Hirst’s TV series Vikings (2013-2018), Viking-music groups such as Amon Amath and Wardruna, A.S. Byatt’s Ragnarok. The End of the Gods (2011), or Marvel’s Thor (2011-) suggest that imaginings about Vikings, shield maidens and Norse gods reverberate beyond the borders of Scandinavia. The aim of this interdisciplinary conference is to explore constructions of the medieval North across genres and media from the Nordic renaissance in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to the present. The conference will focus on adaptations of Old Norse and medieval texts; on the refashioning of the medieval North in literature, art, music, film, etc.; and on the uses of the North, for instance in nineteenth-century nation-building or in contemporary political discourse. The conference asks participants to consider the ideological, cultural, aesthetical, generic and other implications of these refashionings of the medieval North; diachronic perspectives in the changing imagery; or the theoretical foundations for such usages.

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers or panels of three papers on topics that can include, but are not limited to:

  • Adaptations of Nordic mythology
  • Eighteenth-century antiquarianism and the medieval
    North
  • The medieval North in European Romanticism
  • The ballad revival in Scandinavia, Britain, and Germany
  • Conceptualizations of the medieval North
  • The North as imaginary geography
  • Nordic medievalism and its relation to specific genres
  • The borders of Nordic medievalism – geographically,
    historically, theoretically
  • Nordic medievalism and politics
  • The sound of the medieval North
  • Nordic medievalism across visual media: Film, TV series, computer games
  • Re-enacting the medieval North
  • Nordic medievalism in the museum

Please send inquiries or proposals of no more than 300 words and a short biography by 1 February 2020 to Lis Møller at litlm@cc.au.dk.

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CALL FOR PAPERS

Studies in Medievalism XXX
Political Medievalism II

From Hitler’s “Third Reich” to Bush’s “crusade” against terrorism, professional politicians have often invoked the Middle Ages to justify their actions. But they are far from alone, for many of their constituents have also deployed medievalism for political purposes, as in condemning impoverished countries for “failing to escape” the Middle Ages. Indeed, much of medievalism, not to mention the study of it, has revolved around politics of one kind or another, as became evident from the unprecedented number of submissions to our previous volume (XXIX) on this theme. Studies in Medievalism, a peer-reviewed print and on-line publication, is therefore once again seeking not only feature articles of 6,000-12,000 words (including notes) on any postmedieval responses to the Middle Ages, but also essays of approximately 3,000 words (including notes) on the intersection of medievalism (studies) and politics. How exactly have professional and amateur politicians misconstrued, mangled, and manipulated the Middle Ages and to what end? How have politics influenced the development of medievalism and/or study of it? In what sense, if any, is it possible to have medievalism (studies) without politics? How might medievalism otherwise be deployed in professional or amateur politics? In responding to these and related questions, contributors are invited to give particular examples, but their submissions, which should be sent to Karl Fugelso (kfugelso@towson.edu) in English and Word by August 1, 2020 (note that priority will be given to papers in the order they are received), should also address the implications of those examples for the discipline as a whole.  CLICK HERE for the Style Sheet.

Studies in Medievalism is the oldest academic journal dedicated entirely to the study of post-medieval images and perceptions of the Middle Ages. It accepts articles on both scholarly and popular works, with particular interest in the interaction between scholarship and re-creation. Its aim is to promote the interdisciplinary study of medievalism as a contemporary cultural phenomenon. Originally published privately, Studies in Medievalism is currently published by Boydell & Brewer, Ltd.. Click on the below links to Back Volumes for details and to order online.

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CALL FOR PAPERS

Studies in Medievalism XXIX:
Political Medievalism

From Hitler’s“Third Reich”to Bush’s “crusade”against terrorism, professional politicians have often invoked the Middle Ages to justify their actions. But they are far from alone, for many of their constituents have also deployed medievalism for political purposes, as in condemning impoverished countries for “failing to escape”the Middle Ages. Indeed, much of medievalism, not to mention the study of it, has revolved around politics of one kind or another. Studies in Medievalism, a peer-reviewed print and on-line publication, is therefore seeking not only feature articles of 6,000-12,000 words (including notes) on any postmedieval responses to the Middle Ages, but also essays of approximately 3,000 words (including notes) on the intersection of medievalism (studies) and politics. How exactly have professional and amateur politicians misconstrued, mangled, and manipulated the Middle Ages and to what end? How have politics influenced the development of medievalism and/or study of it? In what sense, if any, is it possible to have medievalism (studies) without politics? How might medievalism otherwise be deployed in professional or amateur politics? In responding to these and related questions, contributors are invited to give particular examples, but their submissions, which should be sent to Karl Fugelso (kfugelso@towson.edu) in English and Word by August 1, 2019, should also address the implications of those examples for the discipline as a whole.

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Sessions at Kalamazoo 2018!

Saturday 10am Session 348 FETZER 1005
Medievalism, Racism, and the Academy (A Roundtable)
Sponsor: International Society for the Study of Medievalism and the Medievalists of Color
Organizer: Amy S. Kaufman, Independent Scholar; Usha Vishnuvajjala, American Univ.
Presider: Wan-Chuan Kao, Washington and Lee Univ.
A roundtable discussion with Colleen C. Ho, Univ. of Maryland; Ilan Mitchell-Smith, Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, California State Univ.–Long Beach; Matthew Vernon, Univ. of California–Davis; Kavita Mudan Finn, Independent Scholar; and Pamela J. Clements, Siena College.

Saturday 1:30 Session 424 SCHNEIDER 1280
King Arthur 2017 (A Roundtable)
Sponsor: International Society for the Study of Medievalism
Organizer: Amy S. Kaufman, Independent Scholar; Usha Vishnuvajjala, American Univ.
Presider: Ann F. Howey, Brock Univ.
A roundtable discussion with Susan Aronstein, Univ. of Wyoming; Kathleen Kelly, Northeastern Univ.; Martin B. Shichtman, Eastern Michigan Univ.; Christine Neufeld, Eastern Michigan Univ.; Abby Ang, Indiana Univ.–Bloomington; and Ann Martinez, Kent State Univ.–Stark.

Saturday 3:30 p.m. session 476 SCHNEIDER 1280
The New “Dark Ages”
Sponsor: International Society for the Study of Medievalism
Organizer: Amy S. Kaufman, Independent Scholar; Usha Vishnuvajjala, American Univ.
Presider: Usha Vishnuvajjala

  • Religion, Science, and Conspiracy Theories: The Flat Earth in the Middle Ages and Today, Shiloh Carroll, Tennessee State Univ.
  • Not as Sexy as We Thought: Echoes of the Dark Ages in Modern Sexual Conduct for Women, Amy Burge, Cardiff Univ.
  • Medievalism, Medievalists, and Conditional Reproductive Justice, Rebecca Huffman, Univ. of Michigan–Ann Arbor
  • A Dark Stage for the Dark Ages: Medieval Theatre as Protest (Then and Now), Carol L. Robinson, Kent State Univ.–Trumbull

 

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40% Off Medievalism Titles!


Use promo code BB533

before February 28, 2018

to get 40% off!

Medievalism in A Song of Ice and Fire and Game of Thrones
Shiloh Carroll

Medievalism in a Song of Ice & Fire & Game of ThronesOne of the biggest attractions of George R.R. Martin’s high fantasy series A Song of Ice and Fire, and by extension its HBO television adaptation, Game of Thrones, is its claim to historical realism. The author, the directors and producers of the adaptation, and indeed the fans of the books and show, all lay claim to Westeros, its setting, as representative of an authentic medieval world. But how true are these claims? Is it possible to faithfully represent a time so far removed from our own in time and culture? This book explores Martin’s and HBO’s approaches to and beliefs about the Middle Ages and how those beliefs fall into traditional medievalist and fantastic literary patterns.

List price: $39.99
Offer price: $23.99

Derek Jarman’s Medieval Modern
Robert Mills

The artist and filmmaker Derek Jarman (1942-1994) had a lifelong appreciation of Derek Jarman's Medieval Modernmedieval culture. But with the possible exception of Edward II, Jarman’s films have not been identified to date as making a major contribution to medieval cinema. This book is the first to uncover a rich seam of medievalism in Jarman’s art. Taking in major features such asCaravaggio, The Garden and The Last of England, as well as some of the unrealised screenplays and short experimental films, the book proposes an expanded definition of medieval film that includes not just works set in or about the Middle Ages, but also projects inspired more broadly by the period.

List price: $34.95
Offer price: $20.97

Translating Early Medieval Poetry
Transformation, Reception, Interpretation

Edited by Tom Birkett & Kirsty March-LyonsTranslating Early Medieval PoetryThe first decades of the twenty-first century have seen an unprecedented level of creative engagement with early medieval literature, ranging from the long-awaited publication of Tolkien’s version of Beowulf and the reworking of medieval lyrics by Ireland’s foremost poets to the adaptation of Eddic and Skaldic poetry for the screen. This collection brings together scholars and accomplished translators working with Old English, Old Norse and Medieval Irish poetry, to take stock of this extraordinary proliferation of translation activity and to suggest new ways in which to approach these three dynamic literary traditions.

List price: $99
Offer price: $59.40

Medievalism, Politics and Mass Media
Appropriating the Middle Ages in the Twenty-First Century

Andrew B.R. ElliottMedievalism, Politics and Mass Media

Many current events, such as George Bush’s reference to the War on Terror as a “Crusade”, are couched in loaded medieval terms. This book analyses how such metaphors work, questioning the effect such medieval terminology can have on a mass-mediated audience and upon an understanding of the Middle Ages in general.

List price: $39.95
Offer price: $23.97

 

The Image of Edward the Black Prince in Georgian and Victorian England: Negotiating the Late Medieval Past

The Image of Edward the Black Prince in Georgian and Victorian England: Negotiating the Late Medieval Past
Barbara Gribling
List price: $90
Offer price: $54

Petrarch and the Literary Culture of Nineteenth-Century France: Translation, Appropriation, Transformation

Petrarch and the Literary Culture of Nineteenth-Century France: Translation, Appropriation, Transformation
Jennifer Rushworth
List price: $120
Offer price: $72

The Making of Medieval History

The Making of Medieval History
Edited by Graham A. Loud & Martial Staub
List price: $34.95
Offer price: $20.97

Chivalry and the Medieval Past

Chivalry and the Medieval Past
Edited by Katie Stevenson & Barbara Gribling
List price: $99
Offer price: $59.40

Georgian Gothic: Medievalist Architecture, Furniture and Interiors, 1730-1840

Georgian Gothic: Medievalist Architecture, Furniture and Interiors, 1730-1840
Peter N. Lindfield
List price: $99.00
Offer price: $59.40

Medievalist Enlightenment: From Charles Perrault to Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Medievalist Enlightenment: From Charles Perrault to Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Alicia C. Montoya
List price: $85
Offer price: $51

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Call for Submissions

Studies in Medievalism XXVIII

Though scholars have addressed many examples of medievalist discrimination, much work remains to be done on the treatment of systematically underrepresented and/or disenfranchised communities in postmedieval responses to the Middle Ages. Moreover, the recent, highly public exchange between Rachel Fulton Brown and Dorothy Kim suggests we, as scholars of medievalism, need to examine discrimination among our own ranks. What biases are suggested by our choice of topics, our approaches to them, and the fora in which we discuss them? How are those conversations shaped by publishers, universities, and other institutions that represent the Establishment? If we wish to expose, subvert, or avoid such prejudices, how can we best do so? Studies in Medievalism, a peer-reviewed print and on-line publication, is seeking 3,000-word (including notes) essays on these and related questions about medievalism and about the scholarship on it, as well as 6,000 to 12,000-word (including notes) articles on any postmedieval responses to the Middle Ages. Please send all submissions in English and Word to Karl Fugelso (kfugelso@towson.edu) by August 1, 2018. CLICK HERE for the Style Sheet.

Studies in Medievalism is the oldest academic journal dedicated entirely to the study of post-medieval images and perceptions of the Middle Ages. It accepts articles on both scholarly and popular works, with particular interest in the interaction between scholarship and re-creation. Its aim is to promote the interdisciplinary study of medievalism as a contemporary cultural phenomenon. Originally published privately, Studies in Medievalism is currently published by Boydell & Brewer, Ltd.. Click on the below links to Back Volumes for details and to order online.

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